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Spotlight on Ireland - Our Ultimate Global Camping Guide
Spotlight on Ireland - Our Ultimate Global Camping Guide

Spotlight on Ireland - Our Ultimate global camping guide

This month we are kicking off our guide to camping all around the world, a simple 2 minute read to tell you all you need to know. Places we have been to and some of our amazing community members also. We are taking suggestions for the Winter guide now also. Get in touch.

At the end of the month, we will share this in a handy to use guide to store wherever you need it.

Introduction

There’s nothing quite like the sense of freedom and getting back to nature that camping holidays bring, and campsites in Ireland are the perfect place to escape. It’s all about enjoying the lush green countryside, wide-open spaces, and beautiful scenery. And whether you’re a seasoned family camper or a first-time campervanner, there’s a brilliant variety of things to see, and places to stay.


Things to consider before camping in Ireland

  • The average temperature during the summer is between 16-20 °C. Apart from short refreshing showers, this is Ireland’s driest season.
  • The vast majority of Irish people speak English, but Irish (Gaelic) is the official language of the Republic. That’s why you’ll see road signs and other public signage in both languages.
  • Big cities like Dublin and Belfast are lovely; however, the charm of the small towns and villages shows the heart of Ireland. Many of these little cities come alive at night as shop owners close their stores and head straight to the local watering hole for a hot meal, a cold drink, and lively music from local musical legends.
  • This is another universal rule for most of Europe. Many cities practically shut down on Sundays. Many of the attractions are closed the entire day or only open a few hours.

Tips for Camping in Ireland

  • Insulate - Insulation works not only in the cold to help keep you warm but also in the heat to help keep you cool. This is why Crua’s range of insulated tents are truly all-season products.
  • Rain and Sun - Take a light raincoat but also sunglasses! Although the sun may not seem very bright, it is still important to use sunscreen. The hottest months are July and August.
  • Campsites - There are many great campsites in Ireland to choose from and a well-established camping culture. Campsites can be booked through Campsited.com
  • Wild Camping - Wild camping in Ireland can be tricky. The last thing you want is a gun-yielding farmer shouting at you in the middle of the night. Avoid places with obvious “no camping” signs and seek the permission of the landowner where possible.

Common places to visit in Ireland

  • Cliffs of Moher - The Cliffs rise to 702 feet (214 m) at their highest point and range for 8 km (5 miles) over the Atlantic ocean. The sheer scale and dramatic impact of the cliffs never ceases to amaze and delight in equal measure
  • Ring of Kerry - The Ring of Kerry is a scenic drive around the Iveragh Peninsula in southwest Ireland’s County Kerry. It's a 179km-long, the circular route takes in rugged and verdant coastal landscapes and rural seaside villages offering spectacular views of meadows, lakes and rugged mountains.
  • The Giant’s Causeway - The Giant's Causeway is an area of about 40,000 interlocking basalt columns, the result of an ancient volcanic fissure eruption. It is located in County Antrim on the north coast of Northern Ireland.
  • Connemara National Park - Situated in the West of Ireland in County Galway, Connemara National Park covers some 2,000 hectares of scenic mountains, expanses of bogs, heaths, grasslands, and woodlands.
  • The Burren - Lunar-like landscape of rock and cliffs with 7 walking trails, woodland, otters, mink and lizards located in County Clare to the west of Ireland. For an experience like walking on the moon, the karst landscape of this landscape is the best bet.
  • Aran Islands - The Aran Islands are 3 rocky isles guarding the mouth of Galway Bay, in western Ireland. They’re known for their ancient sites. The largest island, Inishmore, is home to the prehistoric fort of Dún Aonghasa, perched on top of a high cliff.

Hidden gems in Ireland

  • Dzogchen Beara (pronounced Sod-jen-bear-a) - Dzogchen Beara is a Tibetan Buddhist Retreat center located on the wild and beautiful Beara Peninsula in County Cork, in south-west Ireland. https://www.dzogchenbeara.org
  • Dursey Island - Dursey Island (Irish: Oileán Baoi (Island of the Bull in Viking Norse)) is one of the few inhabited islands that lie off the southwest coast of Ireland. It is situated at the western tip of the Beara Peninsula in the west of County Cork. https://www.durseyisland.ie/
  • Ballybunion Caves - Ancient caves and underground passages have existed for millennia under the town of Ballybunion. These Sous Terra or Underground Chambers lie beneath the cliffs under the "Castle Green" and are thought to have been built during the Iron Age and Christian period. https://www.ballybunion.ie/history-and-folklore/the-caves-of-ballybunion.html
  • Charlie Byrnes Bookshop - Charlie Byrne's, in the heart of Galway city, is a browser's paradise. All ages and tastes are catered for in a space that holds over 100,000 books. https://goo.gl/maps/236KdkwYStt85uSv9

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